1.1232626980.view-opf-salisbury-cathedral-steeple

1.1232626980.view-opf-salisbury-cathedral-steeple


Caption

“Round about the year 1200, Bishop Poore was standing on a hill overlooking the confluence of the local rivers, according to legend, when the mother of Jesus appeared to him, told him to shoot an arrow and build her a church where the arrow fell. The arrow flew more than a mile and fell in the middle of a swamp. There, with complete indifference to such things as health, foundations, access and general practicability, the cathedral was built. Eighty years later, with a technological gamble which makes space travel seem child’s play, the builders erected the highest spire in the country on top of it, thousands of tons of lead and iron and wood and stone. Yet the whole building still stands. It leans. It totters. It bends. But it still stands…a perpetual delight, a perpetual wonder.” —William Golding, “An Affection for Cathedrals”

Attached Source

Transcending Allegory: William Golding’s THE SPIRE (part 2)

I began my previous post, "Transcending Allegory: William Golding's The Spire (part 1)", with a quick rundown of the pitfalls of allegory, how it can grab a narrative by its throat, twist it about, an...